TY ENNIS // STUPID MAN

   Stupid Man   by Ty Ennis, on view through June 20, 2016 (images Mario Gallucci Studio)

Stupid Man by Ty Ennis, on view through June 20, 2016 (images Mario Gallucci Studio)

  Clocked In (Sam Sheepdog) , 2016, acrylic on canvas, 14 x 11”

Clocked In (Sam Sheepdog), 2016, acrylic on canvas, 14 x 11”

  El de la rollona (Mama’s Boy // After Goya) , 2016, acrylic on canvas, 14 x 11”

El de la rollona (Mama’s Boy // After Goya), 2016, acrylic on canvas, 14 x 11”

  Iggy Papa , 2016, acrylic on canvas, 10 x 8"

Iggy Papa, 2016, acrylic on canvas, 10 x 8"

On view May 13–June 20, 2016
Opening reception Sunday, May 15 (3–6PM)
Closing reception & catalog release party Saturday, June 18 (5:30–7PM)

For his second solo exhibition at Nationale, Ty Ennis presents Stupid Man, a series of small black & white paintings that explore his present day-to-day life as an artist and young father with a full-time day job. Like most of his past work, they tell individual stories that are all part of a larger narrative. This new body of work, in its loose composition and black and white presentation, adds a more raw and stripped down layer to the ongoing monologue which has been the crux of Ennis’s work for the past twelve years. Although deeply personal and intimate, Stupid Man ultimately explores themes that inspire and challenge us all. 

Ty Ennis (born 1981, Spokane, WA) lives and works in Portland, OR, where he graduated from Pacific Northwest College of Art in 2003 with a BFA in Printmaking. His work was previously included in the 2006 Oregon Biennial at the Portland Art Museum. He has exhibited across Portland at Nationale, Open Gallery, New American Art Union, Pulliam Deffenbaugh, and the Art Gym at Marylhurst University; in Seattle, WA, at Prole Drift; and in Los Angeles, CA, at William H Bothy. Ennis is the recent recipient of a Project Grant from the Regional Arts & Culture Council and a Career Opportunity Grant from the Oregon Arts Commission. He joined Nationale as a represented artist in the spring of 2013.

This project was funded in part by the Regional Arts & Culture Council